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Locking Back DeficitAugust 31 2016

An $80,000 deficit from 1979 greeted the CEDA members at the 1980 Annual General Meeting. The more than $300,000 in expenditures in the previous year had outstripped revenue by that much. Treasurer R. Ellis explained there were three reasons for this deficit: 

• a decrease in income from membership dues caused by numerous mergers

• increased activity by all committees, especially the Operations Research group 

• a loss in operation at the 1979 St. John’s Conference

Mr. Ellis stressed that the association was still financially sound, and noted that neither the annual dues or the conference fees had been increased for several years.

Executive Director Richard Taylor announced his resignation effective in May so that he could take up a position with COPEL in Quebec. A recruitment committee was set up under the Chairmanship of incoming President Jack Nairn to seek a replacement. The committee eventually selected the current President, Stan Wild, an experienced association executive who at that time was employed as President of the Warehousing Association.

At a Board meeting in fall 1980, a motion was made that “in order to cut our conference costs and decrease future expenses, CEDA discontinue the practice of paying the airfare of delegates attending the conference.” Under this 20-year-old provision, CEDA had been paying the return economy airfare of one delegate per member company. Past President Jim Redmond warned the Directors that they should think carefully about this motion; it was his opinion that the practice should be continued, as it encouraged smaller, less wealthy members to attend the annual conference. The Directors considered Mr. Redmond’s remarks, but voted to discontinue paying airfare to conferences, subject to the approval of the 1981 Annual General Meeting.

To ensure that large member companies in CEDA did not pay a disproportionally large membership fee, a $200 million dollar ceiling was placed on annual sales for the purpose of calculating member fees. The standard multiplier used in calculating membership costs had made no allowances for members with a larger volume of sales; the fee ceiling allowed larger members to limit their membership fees. This ceiling was seen by the directors as a stop-gap measure until a more equitable system of determining membership dues was decided upon.

The Board decided to set up a system whereby members would be required to report their annual sales in confidence to the Executive Director, so that membership fees could be accurately computed. Up until this time the Executive Director had estimated members sales and it was generally agreed that most estimates were low. (The only members who ever complained about the estimates were those whose sales were overestimated… and there were precious few of those.)

Acting on a recommendation made at meetings held in September and November 1979, the Directors approved a draft bylaw that would change the titles of the CEDA Executive. The President would become the Chairman of the Board, Vice Presidents would become Vice Chairmen of the Board, and the Executive Director would become President. The proposed changes required the approval of the members and were therefore to be circulated to members with the agenda for the 1981 Annual meeting with a recommendation that they be approved. (The change was voted on and approved the next year.)

Photo courtesy of jarmoluk at Pixabay.

 

David Gordon

Over the past few months as we’ve sat in strategy development meetings with distributors, reviewed distributor purchasing information, and talked to manufacturers’ reps and contractors, we’ve seen a purchasing trend that is roiling the industry. The trend, which mirrors what is happening in lighting with “unfamiliar brands,” is accelerated growth and acceptance of less familiar brands for infrastructure type products (electrician supplies, boxes, fittings, etc … consumables and products that go within the wall). This then begs the questions, “What is the value of a manufacturer’s brand,” and “What are the implications for manufacturers and distributors?”

Many have seen this as driven by...

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As part a family company, I have heard my father talking about business ever since I was a little boy. Although it had always interested me, I had never thought I would end up working alongside my father and my uncle in the company my grandfather started a long time ago.

I had been working in sales ever since I was 16 years old in many different markets than the one I was about to enter, but I thought it would be relatively easy to handle. Very quickly I started noticing the challenges of being a 22-year-old sales rep for electrical products entering a world where most of the manufacturers’ agents had been in the business for a long time.

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Laura Dempsey

Owen Hurst

Laura Dempsey has been working as an outside sales representative for E.B. Horsman & Son for over 15 years, and is a member of the BCEA U40 network of young professionals. She lives in Langley, BC and is proud of her position and work with E.B. Horsman, particularly as she is the second Dempsey generation to work for the company.

Laura’s mother Shelly has worked at E.B. Horsman for over 25 years, and instilled in Laura a determination to succeed. Laura followed in her mother’s footsteps after witnessing how much her mother enjoyed her work and the people she works with at E.B. Horsman.

Read more: Laura Dempsey

Laura Dempsey

Owen Hurst

I've known John Sencich since CEW began publishing. He agreed from the outset to be part of the newsletter’s Editorial Board. His contribution was regular and sustained. Always present to answer my technical questions, and refer me to the right person for additional information as needed. Always available despite his role as senior leader of an influential company.

Over the past five years, many industry insiders have cited John Sencich when I asked them to name someone who had made a difference in their lives or had inspired them as a leader.

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EFC 2018 Scholarship Program

This year Electro-Federation Canada (EFC) will award $156,250 across 62 scholarships supported by manufacturers, distributors and associations.

The annual EFC Scholarship Program reflects an industry that understands its responsibility to attract future talent. In the face of technological, demographic, and socio-economic evolution, the employment landscape is in constant transformation resulting in substantial challenges for companies as they work to define and redefine their recruitment practices. Furthermore, as competition for the brightest and the best of the next generation of business leaders intensifies, it’s more important than ever to engage young people. 

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Online

Building a simple customer experience that satisfies your customers’ expectations is a starting point (or evolution) in your digital journey. You might be asking yourself, “How do I know what my customer wants?” The data are available from their behaviour online, and many of your customers will tell you what they want. Putting the pieces together can appear complex, but it can be simplified if you segment the optimization of your customers’ experience into three buckets: design, usability and search.

Design, usability, and search pertain to how you can serve your customer. In order for your website to create value in the eyes of the customers, you have to optimize your website so that it is accessible to the greatest number of your ideal customers. Value increases with the number of customer touchpoints that the customers use.

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